David Wilcock: All right. Welcome back to “Cosmic Disclosure”. I hope you’re having an amazing day, and maybe after you see this episode, it’s going to become even more amazing. I’m here with Corey Goode, and we have a special guest today, Mark McCandlish, one of the original thirty-nine whistleblowers who came forward at the Disclosure Project event on May 9, 2001, at the National Press Club in Washington, D.C. to disclose the reality of the extraterrestrial presence on Earth.

|So, Corey, welcome to the show.

Corey Goode: Thank you.

David: All right. We’re going to start now with an intro and overview of Mark, in his own words, from his background. Let’s take a look.

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MARK’S STORY

Mark McCandlish: My electronics aptitude was so high right out of high school that the Air Force was really enthusiastic about getting me to work on something like a weapons control system on aircraft. So that’s where I wound up going.

After I got out of the Air Force, I used the GI Bill to go to Brigham Young University, studying design illustration. And then I went to Art Center College of Design as an automotive design major and eventually changed my major to just straight illustration when I began to see that the bottom was about to fall out of the automotive industry, and they weren’t going to be hiring any designers in the late ’70s, early ’80s.

And that’s when I went to work for the defense industry.

I had been approached by the Calabasas Division of Lockheed, and I think this was right at or right before the time that Lockheed joined with Martin Marietta and became Lockheed Martin.

And the gentleman that had asked me to prepare this illustration said that, “We can’t tell you what it looks like. We can’t tell you anything about the aircraft, only that it’s the second generation in an existing family of extremely high speed, high altitude aircraft.

And so we need you to draw a picture of something that looks really fast.

So I looked around, and the two fastest aircraft that I was aware of at the time was, of course, the SR-71 Blackbird, which is Mach 3 , and then the prototype XB-70 Valkyrie that was built by Rockwell International’s North American Aircraft Division.

So I combined features from those two aircraft, and I thought, this is a really cool-looking aircraft.

And I went in, and much to my surprise, they had a couple of engineers from Lockheed Skunk Works there.

And it was an order gentleman with glasses, a receding hairline. And they were actually wearing little white lab coats with the pocket protector and the slide rule and this kind of thing.

And so I opened up my sketchpad, and I turned around, and I slid it across this big, beautiful, mahogany table in this conference room.

And right away, I could see that something was wrong. The gentleman both took on an appearance of being kind of startled, like they were seeing something they weren’t expecting.

And then one of the two gentlemen – the man with the glasses, the receding hairline – you could literally see his face turn red. You could see beads of sweat starting to form on his forehead and his lip. And his hands started to tremble.

And he slams his hand down on the notepad, and he says, “What are these canards, and what are these winglets out on the wings? Those would be torn off at Mach 17 . . .” And he stopped himself right there as he said “Mach 17”.

And I thought, “That’s 12,000 miles an hour [19,300 kph]!”

And they were both upset. And they were upset in a way that, at first, I thought it was because I didn’t do a good job, because the illustration didn’t look credible.

And then I thought, “No, this is something else.” They’re reacting because I’ve hit something. I’ve hit the nail right on the head with this illustration, and they may perceive that what I’ve done here is because of some kind of a leak – some kind of an information leak.

And so the first thing I did was I tried to assure them by saying, “Well, look, I’ll be happy to illustrate whatever you want, but the fact is, I just don’t know what your aircraft looks like because nobody’s told me. They said they can’t tell me. The design is classified. So what I’ve done here is I’ve combined most of the most interesting features from these two aircraft – the two fastest aircraft that I know of – the SR-71 and the XB-70.”

And so then they kind of calmed down a little bit and relaxed. But at that point, the cat was already out of the bag. They’d said “Mach 17”.

It really pointed out to me that there were some programs that were going on. And, of course, you always assume that there’s something classified going on all the time behind the scenes.

But as far as aircraft design was concerned, it really helped to illustrate that there were things going on – advanced projects – that were really pushing the envelope in terms of material use, high speed, high altitude and propulsion systems that had never been seen before – these supersonic combustion ramjet or scramjet engines.

And so it was an eye-opener. That’s for sure. It let me know that there were other things out there that the general public didn’t know about.

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David: Okay. So what you see there is very interesting. Here’s a guy who’s describing having a direct one-on-one meeting with insiders from Lockheed Martin Skunk Works.

And they told him that canards and winglets on the plane would fall off at Mach 17. So clearly, he had access to the real deal.

Corey, what were your thoughts as you watched this clip?

Corey: It was pretty interesting. I had seen information about these early planes that they were developing, and they were very, extremely aerodynamic.

But when he was talking, for some reason – it popped in my mind – I remember a type of engineered crystal that they were using that they would put on the outside of these craft that . . . You know, like piezoelectric crystals. If you hit them, they’ll give off an electrical charge?

David: Yeah, sure.

Corey: These convert friction heat into electric charges.

David: Oh, that makes sense.

Corey: And then the skin of the plane would have this crystalline material painted over it. And then the heat would be turned into electricity. The electricity would transfer through the skin of the plane into something that would quickly store the electricity. So it would be kind of like a heat sink.

It would be pulling electricity very quickly, and heat couldn’t build up.

David: Well, let me just mention that there are known things called photo cells, which we already have in electronics, where they can sense a light source and actually convert that light to electricity.

So this idea of basically what you’re describing as a thermal couple on the outside of the plane, that’s totally plausible within electronics that that could work. I just never thought of it before. It’s fascinating.

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